An Honest Comparison

We know consumers have their doubts about indoor farming. That’s why we’ve provided an honest, side-by-side comparison between Dream Harvest’s methods and those of traditional organic farms.  We respect tradition, but we also see significant advantages in finding smarter ways to grow our food.

 
 
 
 

vs.

IRRIGATION

Consume under 40k gallons of water per acre for each harvest of greens

 

Consume  650k gallons of water per acre for each harvest of greens


PEST CONTROL

Controlled environment requires no pesticides

 

Organic pesticides, which are difficult to wash and can damage top soil and flow with runoff


PLANT NUTRITION

Organic nutrients from natural sources

 

Organic fertilizers and soil


FARM SPACE

Vertical, indoor farming produces 35x more produce per acre of land than outdoor farming

 

Requires inefficient use of large quantities of limited arable land, which can strain soil


RUNOFF

Recycled water and closed-loop system create no runoff

 

Pesticides and fertilizers create polluted runoff: a leading source of water quality impacts, impairment to wetlands, and contamination of estuaries and ground water


PHOTO-SYNTHESIS

Efficient indoor lighting: powered by sustainable energy, maximizing crop yields

 

Sunlight: limited by sun exposure


POWER

100% Texas wind energy powers our farm. We are an EPA Green Power Partner

 

Tractors and other diesel-powered field equipment create greenhouse gas emissions


LOCATION

We farm in your city

 

Soil and weather limit crops to ideal outdoor locations, like California


FRESHNESS

Delivered hours after harvest

 

Can take weeks to reach customer after being harvested


QUALITY

Freshest produce leads to best possible quality, taste and nutrition

 

Long delivery times reduce quality and taste of produce


FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS

Risks virtually eliminated by using highly filtered water and no soil. Farmers follow strict procedures to protect indoor crops

 

Vegetables can be contaminated by soil, water, or farm workers carrying bacteria